Staff Blogs: University of Leicester

Welcome to the University of Leicester academic and staff blog site.

From Royal Society Fellows to early-career researchers, corporate services to academic related – all members of staff are engaged in creating new knowledge, whether in the sciences, social sciences, business, the arts or wherever their interests lie. This wealth of research expertise means Leicester has a unique and critical role to play in helping to overcome major challenges faced by society.

This site aims to provide a platform for University of Leicester staff – whether early-career, established or somewhere in between; whether researching and rehearsing ideas, networking with peers, or an early form of publication. As you would expect from Leicester, it’s inclusive and accessible so we look forward to your comments.

Latest posts from the staff blogs

Sophie Dumville

Careers: Work experience with the SAPPHIRE research group – Aisha Seedat

SAPPHIRE recently had the opportunity to have a Health Studies undergraduate student, Aisha Seedat, do a work experience placement with us. Below, Aisha writes about her time with SAPPHIRE and what she’s taken away from the experience.   I’m Aisha, a second year Health Studies student at De Montfort University (DMU). I recently started work […]

Andrew Dunn

Sexual violence

The International Day for the Elimination of Sexual Violence in conflict was held on the 19th June. Read what Angelina Jolie said about this in a 2016 LSE event. United Nations statements   Official website Official resolution establishing the day in 2015. 2018 Report of the Secretary-General on conflict-related sexual violence (S/2018/250) Illustrated version Closing the […]

Clare Anderson

A Global History of Convicts and Penal Colonies

  The main objective of the ‘Carceral Archipelago’ project has been to write the history of convicts and penal colonies into global history, by synthesizing existing research on some geographical contexts with new work on others. My edited volume, A Global History of Convicts and Penal Colonies, published in May 2018 , represents an important […]

Steve Rooney

“So, can we say ‘skills’?”

  As those whose unhappy lot in life it is to have to listen to me moaning on about matters educational will know, I’m not a big fan of the term ‘skills’. Or, more precisely, I’m not a big fan about how this term is often used. I’m even less keen when it’s preceded by […]

Archive Fever at the Harry Ransom Center (HRC)

Following a research visit to the Harry Ransom Center, CWEW editor of Waugh’s Helena, Sara Haslam, reflects on her illuminating experience.     I spent two very happy weeks in the HRC archives in April 2018, working on my edition of Helena. I was unprepared for two things: firstly how much difference it would make […]

Happy International Archives Day 2018!

The University records manager, David Jenkins, and I (Vicky Holmes, University Archivist) thought we’d take the opportunity to flag up IAD18 and explain a bit about what we do all day!   On the 9th of June 1948, the International Council on Archives was created under the auspices of the UNESCO (the United Nations Educational, Scientific […]

jbridges

Sol 2075 Organics on Mars

The latest results from analyses in the search for organics and methane on Mars have just been published by the SAM team on Mars Science Laboratory.  SAM stands for Sample Analyses at Mars, and it is a Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometer for solid samples drilled from the Gale Crater mudstones, and a Tuneable Laser Spectrometer […]

Fight fire with fire? Managing complex contracts when the other party becomes difficult

  In his second blog (first blog can be found here) Dr Haward Soper, recently awarded his PhD, discusses his doctoral findings, giving fascinating insights into the relationships between different parties involved in management contracts. Haward is giving a lunchtime lecture on the 18th May to discuss his research.   As part of my doctoral […]

Martin Coffey

What others think of us is none of our business

This morning I learned that someone from my childhood in another country has died. It is sad above all else for his family and friends, of whom I believe he had many. It is also sad for those who were his fans, who enjoyed the music he produced. Oh yes, did I forget to mention, […]

Museums and social justice – and why I bang on about it quite a lot.

  This week marked the 73rd anniversary of the liberation of Buchenwald Concentration Camp in Germany. Between 1937 and 1945, 280,000 people were imprisoned there. 56,000 of them lost their lives to torture and cruelty. It was a place of deep inhumanity and suffering. A place where people were murdered because of (amongst other things) […]

Deborah Toner

Food Stories – the afterlife of a research project

It’s obviously been quite a while since this blog was updated, but that doesn’t mean we have forgotten about Consuming Authenticities! In fact, plenty of exciting developments have been quietly happening behind the scenes, which I will write more about over the coming weeks and months: we have been continuing to publicise and distribute our […]

Emma Parker

Joe Orton, Edna Welthorpe and Creative Writing by Bryony Adshead

After signing up for an Open Day at the University of Leicester, I was intrigued to receive an email regarding the ‘Yours Faithfully, Edna Welthorpe (Mrs)’ creative writing competition, run by Dr Emma Parker and Chris Shepherd. The prompt, ‘If Joe Orton were alive today, who or what would be the object of his satire?’, […]

Leigh Fletcher

Farewell to Cassini

Seven days left until we say farewell to @CassiniSaturn @CassiniNooo pic.twitter.com/Sx7ACHeKDa — Leigh Fletcher (@LeighFletcher) September 8, 2017 After almost twenty years in space, the Cassini spacecraft is now just seven days away from its final encounter with the giant planet, ending humankind’s first detailed exploration of the ringed planet.  Cassini’s Grand Finale is the […]

Marina Spunta

Luigi Ghirri and the Photography of Place

Our book on Luigi Ghirri has just been published:   M. Spunta and J. Benci (eds), Luigi Ghirri and the Photography of Place. Interdisciplinary Perspectives (Oxford: Peter Lang, 2017)   https://www.peterlang.com/view/product/79823?rskey=lwTAcx&result=1   Many thanks to all the contributors and to all those who supported our research project.   Please share this with interested colleagues.

Grant Denkinson

Automated concept / keyword generation for journal articles in repositories

I was checking out a research paper in the ACM Digital Library: SibylFS: formal specification and oracle-based testing for POSIX and real-world file systems and spotted something interesting: a “Concepts in this article” drop-down “Powered by IBM Watson” For more on Watson, see IBM Watson: Beyond Jeopardy! Q&A I’ve been thinking what calls to action a user […]

The University Leadership Team

International Women’s Day – The Gender Pay Gap at the University of Leicester

Today March 8th 2017 marks International Women’s Day. International Women’s Day is a global day of celebration that marks the struggle for gender equality. It provides a forum for celebrating the role of women and their achievements, identifies challenges for the future and campaigns for change.   We know that one of the greatest challenges […]

Marie Muir

Waffle…not the good kind!

You are in an interview, you are nervous, there are three interviewers and they are all staring at you in suspense. One of them is asking you a question, but your too busy trying to conceal your nerves so you hear ‘Tell me about…experience….school…team?” You launch off in to an answer about your netball teams’ […]

Emma Battell Lowman

Being Disturbingly Informative. By Shane McCorristine

  Last year I visited a fine old building nestled incongruously close to the skyscrapers and busy financial offices of Market Street in downtown Philadelphia. The building houses the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the oldest private medical organisation in the United States (founded in 1787). Today, Philadelphia’s heyday as the centre of medical and […]

Alberto Fernández Carbajal

Tehmina Kazi reading and Muslim LGBT activism

As the final event of the Queering Islam events series for 2015-2016, Tehmina Kazi, the Director of British Muslims for Secular Democracy, visited us at the University of Leicester to do a reading of her story ‘The Tulip Asylum’, a story about homosexuality in contemporary Iran. Below you can find an excerpt of her reading and […]

Helen Dexter

A legal war is no less lethal.

The question of the legality of the war in Iraq was, quite deliberately, beyond the scope of Chilcot Enquiry and the report published yesterday makes no direct comment about legality. Never the less, for many the question of the legality of the war is crucial. The initial response to the report is that it indirectly […]

Stephen Walker

Student Perceptions of ‘useful’ Digital Technology

“Now, what I want is, Facts….Facts alone are wanted in life” (Mr Gradgrind) A recent Australian study by Henderson, Selwyn and Aston (2015) found that students use digital technologies to support the logistical aspects of their learning : time-saving; finding out about and fulfilling course requirements; mobile and remote access; researching information; getting organised. Where students […]

Ana Verissimo

Staff away day

The latest staff away day took place at Stamford court, with university and departmental updates, a group activity over coffee to reflect on how the department could improve various aspects of the working environment via the working lives committee, bite-sized research presentations and lunch. In the afternoon, departmental staff got competitive at the sports hall. […]

Memorial Page

Mark Pluciennik died on 7 May at the age of 62, following a battle with a progressive neurological condition. Mark joined the School of Archaeology and Ancient History in 2003 and was the second Director of Distance Learning in Archaeology and Ancient History at Leicester, retiring in 2011. He subsequently held the title of University […]

Paul Boyle

Why Open Access?

We are committed to undertaking research which inspires and delivers change for the better.  So, it is vitally important that our research findings are freely available to the world.   To achieve this, we need to embrace Open Access.  In this short video, I consider the benefits of Open Access and how it can help […]

Philip Shaw

Daring Deeds of Valour

Daring Deeds of Valour By Dr Rachel Bates, University of Leicester The 29 January 2016 marks the 160th anniversary of the Victoria Cross, a key legacy of the Crimean War (1854-56). Over the past four years, I have been looking at how the Crimean War shaped British understanding of war, violence and nationhood. The creation […]

Marie Muir

New Year, New Career, New Outlook

January is rubbish. It’s cold, wet and dark and your holiday is over. You are back, revising hard for your exams and assignment deadlines are coming in thick and fast, so how do you motivate yourself to get back on the job/internship search. Ten members of the Career Development Service Team tell you how; “Plan […]

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