Staff Blogs: University of Leicester

Welcome to the University of Leicester academic and staff blog site.

From Royal Society Fellows to early-career researchers, corporate services to academic related – all members of staff are engaged in creating new knowledge, whether in the sciences, social sciences, business, the arts or wherever their interests lie. This wealth of research expertise means Leicester has a unique and critical role to play in helping to overcome major challenges faced by society.

This site aims to provide a platform for University of Leicester staff – whether early-career, established or somewhere in between; whether researching and rehearsing ideas, networking with peers, or an early form of publication. As you would expect from Leicester, it’s inclusive and accessible so we look forward to your comments.

Latest posts from the staff blogs

Trump and the risks of narcissistic leadership

Professor Mark Stein discusses how Donald Trump shows signs of being a narcissistic leader – and why people have good reason to be concerned. In 2013 I published a paper about the risks and problems of the narcissistic leadership of a New York based billionaire businessman. The paper happened to focus on Dick Fuld, but […]

Andrew Dunn

The ‘Measuring the Information Society Report’ 2016

This major report published by the International Telecommunications Union captures the level of ICT developments in 175 economies worldwide and compares progress since the year 2014.  It includes  ICT Development Index (IDI).  The IDI is a standard tool that governments, operators, development agencies, researchers and others can use to measure the digital divide and compare […]

Katy Roscoe

Attitudes to Convict Ancestry: Documentary Review

In this blog post I review the documentary ‘A Secret History of my Family: Gadbury Sisters’, which aired in 2016, and discuss how it reflects changing attitudes to convict ancestry amongst British and Australian descendants. It is re-blogged from the the wonderful History on the Box in which postgraduate students from the School of History, Politics and IR at the […]

Steve Rooney

‘Holiploigy’ – capturing the complex and emergent nature of teaching, learning and curriculum

Thursday 24th November saw the second in a year-long series of HE Seminars, hosted by the LLI. The seminar, led by Dr Phil Wood (School of Education), was entitled: ‘Conceptualising the complexity of teaching in Higher Education – developing the case for holiploigy.’ As Phil explained, the latter term – new to those of us attending the seminar! […]

Leigh Fletcher

The First 150 Days of Juno

  Back in July, there was much fanfare surrounding the successful arrival of the Juno spacecraft at Jupiter.  A near-perfect engine firing had placed the solar-powered spacecraft into just the right orbit, with the promise of great things to come.  Juno’s science goals are fourfold:  explore the origins, interior structure, atmosphere and magnetosphere of this […]

Marie Muir

Waffle…not the good kind!

You are in an interview, you are nervous, there are three interviewers and they are all staring at you in suspense. One of them is asking you a question, but your too busy trying to conceal your nerves so you hear ‘Tell me about…experience….school…team?” You launch off in to an answer about your netball teams’ […]

The University Leadership Team

How do we measure ‘Learning Gain’?

The Teaching Excellence Framework (TEF) is clearly a hot topic in the Higher Education sector at the moment and occupies the thoughts of many of us across the University for a variety of reasons.   One set of questions being asked by the TEF and through HEFCE-funded projects is “how do students learn, how well […]

Martin Coffey

Know your audience

So often I see PGRs in consultations who are struggling to make the step from application to interview or the step from interview to job. When we explore their application or approach to interviews I find that whilst they might be very bright and articulate people, their focus is entirely on their perspective. They have […]

Margaret Maclean

Frank, the Double Duchesse

Amongst the contents of the Fairclough Collection of engraved portraits, relating to political and social history in 17th century Britain, we have recently discovered this delicately executed miniature of Frances Stuart (née Howard), Duchess of Richmond and Lennox, who died in 1639.  The oval appears to have been cut from a larger composition (in watercolour […]

Museums as sanctuaries from hate?

This morning I saw the front page of the Daily Mail (I’m not going to link to it. Google it if you must) as I walked past a news stand and it made me angry. Nothing new about that. ‘Foreign Lorry Drivers Break The Law’, it yelled in my face. As if no British person […]

Emma Battell Lowman

Being Disturbingly Informative. By Shane McCorristine

  Last year I visited a fine old building nestled incongruously close to the skyscrapers and busy financial offices of Market Street in downtown Philadelphia. The building houses the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, the oldest private medical organisation in the United States (founded in 1787). Today, Philadelphia’s heyday as the centre of medical and […]

Natalie Armstrong

Preventing Overdiagnosis Conference 2016

  SAPPHIRE’s Natalie Armstrong and Caroline Morris have recently returned from the ‘Preventing Overdiagnosis Conference’ (#PODC2016) in sunny Barcelona, in this blog they reflect on this developing area and what they took away from the event.     What is overdiagnosis, and why is it something to be prevented?   Broadly speaking, when people talk about […]

Barbara Cooke

Professor David Bradshaw, 1955-2016

The Complete Works of Evelyn Waugh project is deeply sad to announce the untimely passing of our Co-Investigator, David Bradshaw. David had been ill with cancer for some months. Below are some personal memories of David from members of the CWEW team.               From Barbara Cooke:   I first […]

Grant Denkinson

Glossary for RDM

There are many words used around Research Data Management and providing a glossary seems like a good idea. A few already exist: http://researchdata.ox.ac.uk/home/glossary/ http://vocab.bris.ac.uk/data/glossary/ http://www.dcc.ac.uk/digital-curation/glossary http://dictionary.casrai.org/Category:Research_Data_Domain and there are OA FAQs: http://www.library.manchester.ac.uk/services-and-support/staff/research/services/open-access-at-manchester/faq/ http://openaccess.ox.ac.uk/home-2/faq/ http://www.imperial.ac.uk/research-and-innovation/support-for-staff/scholarly-communication/open-access/faq/   How do we make it big enough to cover what we want, keep it up to date, point people to […]

Alberto Fernández Carbajal

Tehmina Kazi reading and Muslim LGBT activism

As the final event of the Queering Islam events series for 2015-2016, Tehmina Kazi, the Director of British Muslims for Secular Democracy, visited us at the University of Leicester to do a reading of her story ‘The Tulip Asylum’, a story about homosexuality in contemporary Iran. Below you can find an excerpt of her reading and […]

Helen Dexter

A legal war is no less lethal.

The question of the legality of the war in Iraq was, quite deliberately, beyond the scope of Chilcot Enquiry and the report published yesterday makes no direct comment about legality. Never the less, for many the question of the legality of the war is crucial. The initial response to the report is that it indirectly […]

Stephen Walker

Student Perceptions of ‘useful’ Digital Technology

“Now, what I want is, Facts….Facts alone are wanted in life” (Mr Gradgrind) A recent Australian study by Henderson, Selwyn and Aston (2015) found that students use digital technologies to support the logistical aspects of their learning : time-saving; finding out about and fulfilling course requirements; mobile and remote access; researching information; getting organised. Where students […]

Ana Verissimo

Staff away day

The latest staff away day took place at Stamford court, with university and departmental updates, a group activity over coffee to reflect on how the department could improve various aspects of the working environment via the working lives committee, bite-sized research presentations and lunch. In the afternoon, departmental staff got competitive at the sports hall. […]

Memorial Page

Mark Pluciennik died on 7 May at the age of 62, following a battle with a progressive neurological condition. Mark joined the School of Archaeology and Ancient History in 2003 and was the second Director of Distance Learning in Archaeology and Ancient History at Leicester, retiring in 2011. He subsequently held the title of University […]

Looting the Archives: Joe Orton

Dr. Samantha Mitschke has been working in the School of Arts as an AHRC Cultural Engagement Fellow since February. Working with the archives held in Special Collections at the University of Leicester, she has curated a public exhibition taking place in September 2016 as part of the fiftieth anniversary celebrations of the London premiere of […]

Paul Boyle

Why Open Access?

We are committed to undertaking research which inspires and delivers change for the better.  So, it is vitally important that our research findings are freely available to the world.   To achieve this, we need to embrace Open Access.  In this short video, I consider the benefits of Open Access and how it can help […]

Philip Shaw

Daring Deeds of Valour

Daring Deeds of Valour By Dr Rachel Bates, University of Leicester The 29 January 2016 marks the 160th anniversary of the Victoria Cross, a key legacy of the Crimean War (1854-56). Over the past four years, I have been looking at how the Crimean War shaped British understanding of war, violence and nationhood. The creation […]

Marie Muir

New Year, New Career, New Outlook

January is rubbish. It’s cold, wet and dark and your holiday is over. You are back, revising hard for your exams and assignment deadlines are coming in thick and fast, so how do you motivate yourself to get back on the job/internship search. Ten members of the Career Development Service Team tell you how; “Plan […]

Maria Rovisco

Dancing With Strangers: Body and Otherness in the Experience of Citizenship – by Rita Marcalo

This post is authored by Rita Marcalo, dancer, choreographer and Artistic Director of Instant Dissidence, as a response to the Workshop ‘Arts and Citizenship’ held at the Department of Media and Communication in June 2015. Since 2013 I have been developing a performance series entitled Dancing With Strangers. The first instance in the series took the European […]

John

Stata14 and the future of this blog

I have not posted for the last few weeks, not because I have nothing to say but rather because I have been thinking about the future of this blog. I have had in mind for some time that there is a need to say something about the Bayesian analysis facilities that were introduced in Stata14 and while preparing […]

Norman Housley

The Maid of Orleans and Crusading

The Maid of Orleans and Crusading:   reflections on a colloquium La France et l’Orient au temps de Jeanne d’Arc. Idéaux pacifiques et réalités guerrières, Rouen, 29 May 2015 Meeting in the splendid surroundings of the Salle des États in Rouen’s recently opened ‘Historial Jeanne d’Arc’, the speakers at this colloquium gave their attention to a […]

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