8 responses to “Censoring Academics works well for Publishers”

  1. David Mainwaring

    At what point can we expect a Weir/Harvie/Lightfoot/Lilley-edited, Leicester-operated,fully open access journal of Critical Management Studies?

  2. Ken Weir

    Hi David,

    This is something that we are looking into as part of ongoing research into open access and the economics of academic publishing.

    Thanks,
    Ken

  3. Simon Lilley

    Thanks David. We’re working on it, with colleagues in the library and more broadly and have a couple of GRA appointments coming on stream in October to help facilitate this. Watch this space!

  4. Hugh Willmott

    Clearly, an open access journal in CMS (or some such) will not happen unless there is a group of people prepared to put time and effort into this, and it will probably also require institutional backing. Hence the Leicester initiative is to be welcomed. It has to start somewhere. As I see it, there are at least a couple of barriers to be overcome:

    1. The journal must be seen as unaffiliated to any particular institution and must be associated with `leading’ institutions. I wish it were otherwise, but that is how I see it.

    2. The journal must have credibility – something that may only be achieved by involving very well established, highly respected academics as editors or as AEs who are willing to devote time and effort (opportunity costs, etc).

    Otherwise the journal will be seen as a `house journal’ that lacks standing, and will attract submissions and a readership that will struggle to challenge or dislodge established publication outlets. I guess that there may be lessons to be learned from other disciplinary areas (the sciences?) where open access is more established, while being mindful that the nature of our field may be rather different. The key is to develop a journal that becomes the outlet of choice, and eventually gains respect from those making hiring and promotion decisions. Again, I wish it were otherwise, but…

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