Internationalisation and Teaching International Students

On Wednesday 1st February, I had the pleasure of co-running, with Dan Jones from the English Language Teaching Unit (ELTU), an LLI-hosted session on Teaching International Students. The session focussed on the following themes:

 

  • Considering some common experiences and challenges for all HE students
  • Focussing, in particular, on teaching students who are non-native speakers
  • Contextualising students’ prior experiences and qualifications
  • Reflecting on the role of assessment and feedback in supporting students’ academic development
  • Considering practical strategies for engaging international students in a variety of settings

 

In the introduction, I drew some parallels between the experiences of international students and UK students new to HE study, using academic literacies as a conceptual framework for thinking about how students encounter HE learning and how we might support them in doing so: introductory-slides

 

 

Next, Dan provided insights into international students’ prior experience of study. In particular, this part of the session focused on how students’ English language for academic purposes is assessed prior to entry onto University degree programmes: main-session-slides To help explore this further, participants were shown samples of students’ writing and asked to comment on these: samples-of-student-writing

 

 

In the second part of the session, attention shifted (via discussion of common scenarios) to some of the issues tutors and international students experience in different academic settings (e.g. lectures, smaller group seminars, and the production of academic writing): discussion-scenarios. This yielded discussions about both the possible origins of the situations described and strategies for responding to them. To help with these discussions, we referred to relevant sections of Rachel Scudamore’s HEA guide to engaging home and international students.

 

 

The session closed with an overview of the support available to both staff and directly to international students (see links below):

 

Internationalisation in context

The following brief introduction outlines some of the key debates surrounding internationalisation in HE.

 

References from the above introduction

Andreotti, V.O. (2007) An Ethical Engagement with the Other: Spivak’s ideas on Education, Critical Literacy: Theories and Practices, 1(1), 69- 79.

 

Andreotti, V.O. (2011) (Towards) decolonality and diversality in global citizenship education, Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 381-397.

 

Caruana, V. (2014) Re-thinking Global Citizenship in Higher Education: from Cosmopolitanism and International Mobility to Cosmopolitanism, Resilience and Resilient Thinking, Higher Education Quarterly, 68(1), 85-104.

 

Clifford, V. and Montgomery, C. (2014) Challenging Conceptions of Higher Education and Promoting Graduates as Global Citizens, Higher Education Quarterly, 68(1), 28-45.

 

Global Social Theory

 

 

Fanghanel , J. and Cousin, G. (2012) ‘Worldly’ pedagogy: a way of conceptualising teaching towards global citizenship, Teaching in Higher Education, 17(1), 39-50.

 

Haigh, M. (2014) From Internationalisation to Education for Global Citizenship: a Multi-Layered History, Higher Education Quarterly, 68(1), 6-27.

 

Khoo, S-M. (2011) Ethical Globalisation or privileged internationalisation? Exploring global citizenship and internationalisation in Irish and Canadian Universities, Globalisation, Societies and Education, 9(3-4), 337-353.

 

Open Spaces for Dialogue and Enquiry

 

 

Pashby, K. (2015) Conflations, possibilities and foreclosures: Global Citizenship education in a multicultural context, Curriculum Inquiry, 45(4), 345-366.

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Steve Rooney

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